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Diana Gabrielyan’s CD reviewed in The Independent

Michael Church of The Independent reviewed Diana Gabrielyan’s new CD with Russian and Armenian music.

“…fascinating and pellucidly played”

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Rinaldo Zhok’s Liszt-Verdi CD reviewed in Gramophone

Jeremy Nicholas of Gramophone listened to Rinaldo Zhok’s Liszt-Verdi CD:

 

 

“…Zhok’s always elegant playing brings its own rewards, the vocal origins of the music always uppermost and the performances more deeply satisfying than many”

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Liudmila Georgievskaya’s Beethoven/Schumann CD reviewed in the Herald Scotland

Michael Tumelty of the Herald Scotland listened to Liudmila Georgievskayas Beethoven/Schumann CD:

 

“…What a joy is this performance, and what a thrill to hear the developmental links to the great symphony laid bare…”

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Rinaldo Zhok’s Liszt-Verdi CD reviewed in the BBC Music Magazine

Rinaldo Zhok’s Liszt-Verdi CD is reviewed by Malcom Hayes in the BBC Music Magazine’s May edition:

“He conveys each work’s capacity to conjure the world of the opera concerned, and without a trace of meretriciousness in the keyboard virtuosity.”

 

 

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George King’s CD JUBILEES reviewed in the Northern Echo

Gavin Engelbrecht of the Northern Echo listened to George King’s CD Jubilees:

“These are highly pleasurable readings of new music that take the pianist to new sonic boundaries.”

 

 

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Rinaldo Zhok’s Liszt-Verdi CD reviewed in the Northern Echo

Gavin Engelbrecht of the Northern Echo reviewed Rinaldo Zhok’s Liszt-Verdi CD.

He keeps it short, though: “An auspicious beginning”

 

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Rinaldo Zhok’s Liszt-Verdi CD reviewed by Voix des Arts

Joseph Newsome of Voix des Arts wrote a raving review of Rinaldo Zhok’s Liszt-Verdi CD. Read it here.

“The emotion of the music passes from the soul of Verdi, through the mind of Liszt, to the hands of Mr. Zhok.”

“This is a special disc, and the performances on it declare that Rinaldo Zhok is a special pianist.”

We are very happy for Rinaldo and think the praise is well deserved!

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RITMO reviews five Odradek CDs / Part V

The Spanish classical music magazine RITMO reviewed five of Odradek Records CD’s in it’s march edition. Last, but not least, Mariann Marczi’s CD Splinters is reviewed. As a bonus, the last bit of Pina Napolitano’s Schoenberg CD review.

“Marczi has chosen wisely and carefully a repertory of (…) the music for piano of her compatriots. A lesson that teaches us (…) that Hungary was and remains an indispensable reference in music.”

 

One more time in English:

 

Mariann Marczi brings a unique tribute to the great contemporary musicians of her country: the history of music -of Hungary- full of talent and that of the beginning of the twentieth century that gave a new turn thanks to the encounter between Bartok and Kodaly. Rescuing the folk music from the service of the contemporaneity it marries modernity and tradition with exquisite and significant results. Kodaly combines the pentatonic scales with that of the whole-tone: a double homage to the French and Hungarian folk music. The metallic Study of Ligeti, with brilliant sonorities and complex rhythmic frameworks in both hands,

denotes the influence of the percussion and piano of Bartok, proof of the enormous mechanism of an instrument completely dominated by Mariann Marczi. Csapo’s music, with this game of measured and disturbing silences, proposes a challenge and keeps us in suspense every time these silences are becoming more present, every time the absence shows/ emphasizes the presence more.Rimbaud in the Desert (a title of the most suggestive, considering that this is one of the enfants terribles of modern literature, and a Bartleby’s first class), moves in the music of Jeney through pure evocation, a deliberate loss in the desert. A loss with no return.

Marczi has chosen wisely and carefully a repertory of shining, curious examples, some playful, others startling, of the music for piano of her compatriots. A lesson that teaches us where the new and the old are not incompatible and that Hungary was and remains an indispensable reference in music.

 

ritmologo1

RITMO reviews five Odradek CDs / Part IV

The Spanish classical music magazine RITMO reviewed five of Odradek Records CD’s in it’s march edition. The review of Pina Napolitano’s Schoenberg-recording ends with a cliff-hanger, which will be resolved (for technical reasons) in the beginning of the last review.

“…here they have the proposal of this Italian pianist on the Viennese master, a perfect joint between dissection and expressive sensitivity…”

And in English:

 

Schoenberg

The deepening performed by Pina Napolitano in the production for solo piano of Schoenberg (a journey that, at the time, is for the compositional evolution of the Viennese master) shows that it is a music that requires, thoroughness of analysis and a clear expressive intent, at the same time. It is not a paradox, she herself explains it; in the interpretation of these parts, besides the millimetric accuracy when executing each of the notes and their subsequent polyphonic structures, the expressive dramatic character of the founder of the second Viennese school that was linked to the musical expressionism in its early stages must be sought (in fact, there lies the crux of the matter). “Philology and romanticism”, so accurately and timely, define this approach of the music of Schoenberg by Pina Napolitano. Those who tell us that central and Mediterranean Europeans cannot understand each other: here they have the proposal of this Italian pianist on the Viennese master, a perfect joint between dissection (rather microcellular, than cellular) and expressive sensitivity (almost heartbreaking, disturbing), a Schoenberg that in her hands is not a “historically necessary” mere passage, but one of the most significant contributions to the history of contemporary music. And anyone that does not believe it, anyone that thinks that music of the Viennese master is cold, distant and unfathomable, should listen to this interpretation. Certainly you will change your mind. Without a doubt: Schoenberg is not dead.

 

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RITMO reviews five Odradek CDs / Part III

The Spanish classical music magazine RITMO reviewed five of Odradek Records CD’s in it’s march edition. The third one is a review of Liudmila Georgievskaya’s Beethoven and Schumann CD:

“…her approach to Beethoven’s classicism is very accurate, variations like the fourth one are executed in a pristine way, and the finale at large is bordering on perfection.”

 

English version:

 

The Russian pianist Liudmila Georgievskaya brings two colossal examples of the art of variation of Beethoven and Schumann. The orchestral piano of the master of Bonn, makes a journey that almost seems historical due to the multitude of styles and ways of dealing with a simple theme; a deployment of resources showing the musical maturity and genius of the master from the preclassic purity to the prophetic romanticism awaiting his music without lucking the good humour (yes, it had it, if not, listen how the first variation of these Heroic Variations begins). And opposite this musical treatment that transcends in her search for the universal, the intimate, autobiographical character, the Variations of Schumann make an interesting contrast. Revised throughout her career, the Symphonic Etudes (or variations) Op 13, with influences from the romantic piano of Chopin (in fact the Polish composer had just edited his Etudes Op. 10) and based on a theme of the opera of Marschner, The Templar and the Jewess, they become a showcase of contrasting characters on the borderline between the variation and the study of the concert. The Russian pianist Georgievskaya gives a pure, correct, elegant interpretation that could almost be labelled as restrained; her approach to Beethoven’s classicism is very accurate, variations like the fourth one are executed in a pristine way, and the finale at large is bordering on perfection. However, she remains somewhat shy with Schumann, where the sensible being does not turn out to be so relevant after all. In any case, it is an album that brings us to one of the most curious musical forms: variations and their endless possibilities.